85 Most Colorful Flowers in the World (Photos)

Whether they’re in a bouquet you send to a loved one, out in your front garden, or simply along a path you’re walking, flowers bring joy to just about everyone. They’re also some of the most colorful plants on Earth. If you’re looking for ideas for an arrangement or just looking for a colorful midday pick-me-up, you might enjoy this collection of bright blooms.

List of Colorful Flowers

Here’s our list of the most colorful flowers in the world:

1. Blue Tango

Aechmea blue tango plants with colorful flowers
  • Latin name: Aechmea ‘Blue Tango’
  • When it blooms: Late summer/early fall and late winter/early spring
  • Soil needs: Tolerates a range of soil types from somewhat acidic to somewhat alkaline; prefers moist soil
  • Sun exposure: Grows best in partial shade
  • Color varieties: Flower centers are bright pink with bluish tips

This hybrid plant is from the bromeliad family; it’s a relative of the pineapple. It’s a cultivar that was developed specifically for its otherworldly blue color. Though it’s an exotic-looking flower, the Blue Tango can be grown in containers, so it’s an unusually colorful houseplant choice.

2. Bird of Paradise

Bird of paradise flower aka Strelitzia Reginae in nature on a sunny day
  • Latin name: Strelitzia reginae
  • When it blooms: Periodically throughout the year
  • Soil needs: Does best in loamy soil
  • Sun exposure: Prefers full sun or very slight shade
  • Color varieties: Flowers are made of orange sepals and bluish petals

This stunning flower is one of the most exotic-looking on the list. The flower emerges from a “spathe” that looks like the beak of a bird. The bright orange sepals and blue-to-white petals look like a dazzling crest. Though it doesn’t do well in temperatures under 50 degrees, it is a relatively hardy garden plant when grown in warmer climates. 

3. Treasure Flower

Close-up of an orange treasure flower aka Gazania Rigens
  • Latin name: Gazania rigens
  • When it blooms: Late spring and summer
  • Soil needs: Grows well in most types of soil
  • Sun exposure: Prefers full sun; flowers will close in the shade
  • Color varieties: Wild flowers are orange-yellow, but many different colors have been developed in captivity.

This fiery bloom is native to South Africa and Mozambique. Thanks to its beauty, it’s been adopted as a garden plant and ornamental flower across the world. The treasure flower can be found in endless colors thanks to the numerous cultivars developed.

4. Hawaiian Hibiscus

Colorful Hawaiian hibiscus aka Hibiscus Rosa-Sinensis in the garden
  • Latin name: Hibiscus rosa-sinensis
  • When it blooms: Summer and fall
  • Soil needs: Prefers soil that is slightly acidic to neutral
  • Sun exposure: Prefers full sun
  • Color varieties: Wild varieties are red; many bright-colored cultivars exist

This bright red flower is probably the most recognizable Hawaiian flower even though it likely originated in Asia. The hibiscus is a very popular ornamental plant as well, and it comes in a range of tropic-inspired colors. The flowers are edible and can sometimes be used in salads. 

5. Lady’s Slipper Orchid

Close-up of lady's slipper orchid aka Paphiopedilum Callosum isolated on black background
  • Latin name: Paphiopedilum callosum
  • When it blooms: Usually from June to July
  • Soil needs: They prefer moist soil and need more frequent watering in hot weather
  • Sun exposure: Prefers some sun with a good balance of shade
  • Color varieties: Most are a combination of pink and white, with the “slipper” portion being a little darker than the rest of the flower

The name “lady’s slipper orchid” can refer to several species. This one is found in the wild in Vietnam, but it makes a beautiful indoor plant if cared for. The “slipper” part of the name refers to a tiny, slipper-shaped pouch on the flower.

6. Jade Vine

Jade vine aka Strongylodon Macrobotrys hanging from a branch
  • Latin name: Strongylodon macrobotrys
  • When it blooms: Spring and early summer
  • Soil needs: Prefers neutral to acidic soil
  • Sun exposure: Prefers partial shade in tropical or subtropical climates
  • Color varieties: Mostly jade green, but some plants are more blue

This striking vine can be found in the Philippines. As you might be able to guess by looking at it, the jade vine is closely related to many different bean plants. Its beautiful flowers are shaped like claws, making this vine a standout even among unusual flowers. 

7. Citronella Lily

Yellow Asiatic lily aka Lilium Citronella in front of a fence in the garden
  • Latin name: Lilium ‘Citronella’
  • When it blooms: Early to mid-summer
  • Soil needs: Prefers soil that is well-drained
  • Sun exposure: Does best with full to partial sun
  • Color varieties: Bright, sunny yellow with deep purplish brown spots

This cheerful Asiatic lily is a hybrid species. It’s much brighter than many lily colors, and it’s perfect if you’re looking for a deep yellow plant. The citronella lily’s blooms face downward like bells, setting them apart from many other lily species.

8. Candystick

Candystick plant aka Allotropa Virgata in the forest
  • Latin name: Allotropa virgata
  • When it blooms: Usually in the summer
  • Soil needs: Prefers rich soil
  • Sun exposure: Prefers at least partial shade
  • Color varieties: Stripes range from bright red to deep maroon

This odd-looking plant has no green at all. Since it has no chlorophyll, it can’t produce its own food. The candystick plant draws the nutrients it needs from nearby green plants and fungi. You can find it in the forests of the Northwestern United States. 

9. Blue Passion Flower

Blue Passion Flower grows on a vine.
  • Latin name: Passiflora caerulea
  • When it blooms: Between July and October
  • Soil needs: Prefers moist soil with a neutral pH
  • Sun exposure: Prefers lots of sunlight with some shelter; must face south or west when planted in the Northern Hemisphere
  • Color varieties: Blue-white with a greenish center; other species of passion flower come in purple, red, pink, white, and more

This striking flower grows on a vine. In warm enough climates, it makes a beautiful addition to any garden. Its circle of deep blue filaments floats above its 12 white petals. Interestingly enough, this passionflower produces a fruit, but the fruit’s flavor is somewhat bland.

10. Neoregelia Pendula

Neoregelia Pendula prefers lots of sun.
  • Latin name: Neoregelia pendula
  • When it blooms: Usually in the summer
  • Soil needs: Does best with light, well-drained soil
  • Sun exposure: Prefers lots of sun; sun exposure also encourages brighter colors to develop
  • Color varieties: These plants come in many colors. Most have some green, and they can be accented with bright pink, red, maroon, yellow, and more.

These unique and colorful plants have a fascinating symbiosis with poison dart frogs. In South American rainforests, poison dart frog tadpoles often grow up in the water that pools at the center of each bloom.

11. Sacred Lotus

Sacred Lotus grows in water at least 12
  • Latin name: Nelumbo nucifera
  • When it blooms: Usually from April to September
  • Soil needs: Grows in water at least 12″ deep over loamy soil
  • Sun exposure: Prefers partial shade to full sun
  • Color varieties: Usually pink, but can bloom white in nature. Hybrid varieties can be yellow, red, orange, and other bright colors.

This beautiful bloom is the national flower of both Vietnam and India. Its pink-tipped white petals and yellow center make it a peaceful, beautiful sight. In the wild, the sacred lotus grows while floating on water. It is a common food source for wild animals.

12. Gerbera Daisy

Gerbera Daisies are some of the world's most cheerful flowers.
  • Latin name: Gerbera hybrida
  • When it blooms: When potted, blooms at any point of the year
  • Soil needs: Prefers well-drained, nutrient-rich soil
  • Sun exposure: Does best with full sun
  • Color varieties: Gerbera daisies come in many colors including pink, orange, yellow, red, and white.

Gerbera daisies are some of the world’s most cheerful flowers. They come in astonishingly bright colors, and their symmetrical petals make them look like something out of a picture. These daisies thrive as potted plants or as an addition to your garden.

13. Common Lantana

The Common Lantana is part of the verbena family.
  • Latin name: Lantana camara
  • When it blooms: From late spring to early winter
  • Soil needs: Does well in salty or sandy soil
  • Sun exposure: Needs full sun for most of the day
  • Color varieties: Comes in nearly endless colors and color combinations including pink, yellow, blue, white, peach, purple, orange, and more.

This flowering shrub is part of the verbena family, and its bright flowers are perfect for attracting birds, bees, and butterflies. Lantanas aren’t fussy, and they are perfectly content in dry climates and sandy soil, making them a great choice for coastal gardens. 

14. Zinnia

Zinnias are some of the world's most uncommonly beautiful flowers.
  • Latin name: Zinnia elegans
  • When it blooms: Usually from mid summer to early winter
  • Soil needs: Does best in fertile, nutrient-rich soil
  • Sun exposure: Prefers full sun
  • Color varieties: Zinnias come in plenty of colors and color combinations. Remarkably, you can find them in just about any color except for blue.

Though they commonly grace gardens, zinnias are some of the world’s most uncommonly beautiful flowers. They are perfect for newer gardeners who like bright colors, as they are very low-maintenance plants that can bloom for months on end. 

15. Siberian Iris

Irises come in many varieties, but the Siberian iris is especially beautiful and delicate.
  • Latin name: Iris sibirica
  • When it blooms: Usually in late May or early June
  • Soil needs: Does best in moist soil
  • Sun exposure: Prefers full sun but can tolerate partial shade
  • Color varieties: Blooms can be anywhere on the spectrum from blue to violet, but they are sometimes white as well.

Irises come in many varieties, but the Siberian iris is especially beautiful and delicate. Its thin petals are typically a pale blue-violet. The Siberian iris makes a beautiful sight growing wild in the grasslands of Europe.

16. Hollandia Anemone

The Hollandia Anemone looks like a poppy.
  • Latin name: Anemone coronaria ‘Hollandia’
  • When it blooms: Usually from early summer to late fall; in warmer climates, it can even bloom in winter
  • Soil needs: Does well in medium-moist and sandy soils
  • Sun exposure: Does best in full sun
  • Color varieties: Anemone flowers come in different colors, but the Hollandia variety is red with a white center.

Though it looks like a poppy, this flower is actually a specific variety of the anemone flower. It has bright red petals with a white ring around the dark black-brown center. It’s especially easy to grow and tolerates hot, sandy environments incredibly well.

17. Pickwick Crocus

As an ornamental plant, the Pickwick crocus is outstanding.
  • Latin name: Crocus vernus ‘Pickwick’
  • When it blooms: Early spring
  • Soil needs: Average, medium-moist soil
  • Sun exposure: Prefers full sun or little shade
  • Color varieties: This particular variety has purple and white striped petals and a bright yellow center

As an ornamental plant, the Pickwick crocus is outstanding. Its yellow center complements its medium-purple stripes beautifully. Interestingly enough, its lovely flowers will close in rain or in the dark. This plant will spread easily, quickly creating a striking lawn accentor garden centerpiece. 

18. Hanging Lobster Claw

The hanging lobster claw makes a great addition to tropical decorative gardens.
  • Latin name: Heliconia rostrata
  • When it blooms: Spring and summer
  • Soil needs: Prefers moist soil ranging from neutral to acidic
  • Sun exposure: Does best in minimal shade or full sun
  • Color varieties: Flowers are a deep pink-red closer to the stem. At their edges, they are bright green to yellow.

This uniquely beautiful plant serves a special purpose in nature: Its cup-shaped flowers hold water for birds and insects. The hanging lobster claw makes a great addition to tropical decorative gardens. It is the national flower of Bolivia.

19. Desert Five Spot

The Desert Five Spot might look delicate, but it grows in some of the aridest regions of the U.S.
  • Latin name: Eremalche rotundifolia
  • When it blooms: Usually between March and May
  • Soil needs: Prefers dry, sandy desert soil
  • Sun exposure: Does best in full sun
  • Color varieties: Petals can be dark pink to pale pink, although some are closer to lavender in color. The pale centers of the flowers are marked with spots that range from dark red to purple.

This pretty wildflower might look delicate, but it grows in some of the aridest regions of the U.S. You can even find it in Death Valley National Park. Its uniquely curved petals make the flowers look almost like orbs at first glance. Much like morning glories, desert five spots close their flowers at night and open them when the sun comes out. 

20. Sweet Pea Flower

The Sweet Pea Flower prefers cool, well-drained, and nutrient-rich soil.
  • Latin name: Lathyrus odoratus
  • When it blooms: Usually in cooler weather; in colder climates, it blooms from late spring to fall, and in warmer climates, it can even bloom in winter
  • Soil needs: Prefers cool, well-drained, and nutrient-rich soil
  • Sun exposure: Does best in full or partial sunlight
  • Color varieties: Most blooms are pastel blue, pink, or purple, but some specific cultivars have deeper colors

Despite the name, this plant is different from the plant that produces the edible sweet pea. Its blooms smell especially sweet, but its pods can actually be poisonous. These lovely pastel flowers typically grow on long vines, and they look especially beautiful when grown over a trellis or other structure.

21. Glacier Lily

The glacier lily's flowers are a deep lemon yellow.
  • Latin name: Erythronium grandiflorum
  • When it blooms: Usually from late April to June
  • Soil needs: Prefers rich, very moist soil
  • Sun exposure: Does well in partial to full sun
  • Color varieties: Flowers are a deep lemon yellow

This small, bright yellow lily can be found in the northwestern United States, and it is especially plentiful in Mount Rainier National Park. Its bulbs are frequently eaten by grizzly bears. In the past, they were also a food source for Native American tribes in the area.

22. Texas Flame Tulip

The Texas Flame Tulip has petals striped with yellow and red.
  • Latin name: Tulipa ‘Texas Flame’
  • When it blooms: Usually from March to May
  • Soil needs: Prefers sandy soil with lots of nutrients
  • Sun exposure: Does best in full sun to partial shade
  • Color varieties: Tulips come in thousands of different cultivars, but this one has petals striped with yellow and red

Tulips are some of the world’s most popular garden plants. This particular variety brings a fiery energy to any garden or flower arrangement. Interestingly enough, striped petals like the ones on this flower once only came from a tulip-infecting virus. But now, Texas Flame and other multicolored varieties are disease-free. Their colors have been produced by careful breeding.

23. Turk’s Cap Lily

The Turk's cap lily stands out because its petals curl backward.
  • Latin name: Lilium martagon
  • When it blooms: Typically mid-summer to late summer
  • Soil needs: Prefers light, slightly alkaline soil
  • Sun exposure: Does best in partial shade
  • Color varieties: It comes in many colors. Orange, pink, and yellow are more common. Some color varieties have small, dark spots.

The Turk’s cap lily stands out because its petals curl backward, making it look like a tiny hat. And though these plants are especially beautiful, be very careful if you have cats. Like most plants in the Lilium genus, this one can be fatal if a cat ingests it.

24. Chinese Lantern Flower

The Chinese Lantern Flower has a strange, ghostlike appearance in the winter.
  • Latin name: Physalis alkekengi
  • When it blooms: Usually in July
  • Soil needs: It grows well in almost any soil type
  • Sun exposure: Does best in full sun
  • Color varieties: Flowers are usually a deep reddish-orange color

These bright, unusual blooms add character to any garden. And in the winter, they have a strange, ghostlike appearance. The “lantern” part of the flower reduces to paper-like veins, and you can see a berry inside.

25. Zebra Blue

At first glance, the stunning Zebra Blue variety of primrose looks almost artificial.
  • Latin name: Primula acaulis
  • When it blooms: Usually late winter to early spring
  • Soil needs: Does best in moderately nutritious, moist soil
  • Sun exposure: Prefers partial shade
  • Color varieties: This variety has white petals with thin, bright blue stripes and a bright yellow center

At first glance, the stunning Zebra Blue variety of primrose looks almost artificial. But its blue stripes pop out against its yellow center, making it a uniquely beautiful addition to any garden. Even though it looks exotic, it’s an easy plant to grow, making it great for even inexperienced gardeners. 

26. Pin-Cushion Hakea

The Pin-Cushion Hakea can thrive in a wide range of soil types.
  • Latin name: Hakea laurina
  • When it blooms: April through July
  • Soil needs: Can thrive in a wide range of soil types
  • Sun exposure: Prefers full sun
  • Color varieties: The sphere-shaped center can range from deep magenta to crimson red; the “spikes” are white

Australia is home to some of the world’s most stunning wildflowers. This one is one of the most unusual bright flowers on the list, too. Its center is a brilliant magenta, and it’s covered in protruding white filaments that look like spikes. Though it is native to Australia, it’s fairly common in hedges in both Italy and the United States. 

27. Mountain Cornflower

In the garden, the Mountain Cornflower makes a wonderful border plant.
  • Latin name: Centaurea montana
  • When it blooms: Late spring to early summer and then from late summer to fall
  • Soil needs: Prefers dry to medium soil
  • Sun exposure: Prefers full sun to part shade
  • Color varieties: Wild versions are electric blue with darker centers, but domestic cultivars include white, pink, and lavender blooms

The name “cornflower” sounds bland, but this deep blue-purple bloom brings a burst of exciting color to its native landscapes. In the garden, it makes a wonderful border plant. While it is beautiful, it’s also resistant to rabbits and deer. It attracts butterflies, too.

28. California Poppy

The California poppy does well in sandy, poor-quality to medium-quality soil.
  • Latin name: Eschsholzia californica
  • When it blooms: Usually from spring to mid-fall; in warmer areas, from fall through winter as well
  • Soil needs: Does well in sandy, poor-quality to medium-quality soil
  • Sun exposure: Prefers full sun
  • Color varieties: The most famous blooms are golden orange, but these flowers can be cream, pink, red, yellow, and white

These poppies are famous for coating the California hillsides, but the fact that they’re easy to grow makes them ideal to bring home to your garden as well. In the right climate, they are very hardy. They resist deer, drought, and pests, so they are an easy way to add a burst of color to any garden.

29. Candytuft

The Candytuft usually blooms in April or May.
  • Latin name: Iberis amara
  • When it blooms: Usually blooms in April or May
  • Soil needs: Needs soil high in calcium
  • Sun exposure: Does best in full sun
  • Color varieties: Wild plants are pale violet or white, but you can find cultivars in cotton-candy pink, deep pink, and darker violet

This whimsically named bloom grows wild in much of Europe. But in domestic gardens, it’s a lovely pathway edge. Its large, billowing blooms are especially beautiful in bright pink. Even in its white, wild form, this striking flower makes a serene addition to a flower arrangement or home garden. 

30. Chandelier Tree

The Chandelier Tree is native to the Philippines.
  • Latin name: Medinilla cumingii
  • When it blooms: Usually between April and August
  • Soil needs: Prefers rich, fertile soil
  • Sun exposure: Prefers filtered light 
  • Color varieties: Petals are almost always a lively pink in color

This beautiful tree is native to the Philippines. It gets its name from its clusters of brightly colored flowers; they hang like glass from a chandelier.

31. Splendid Pitcher Flower

Splendid Pitcher Flower grows best in misty, overcast conditions
  • Latin name: Nepenthes edwardsiana
  • When it blooms:Year-round
  • Soil needs: Needs soil at a high elevation to grow properly
  • Sun exposure: Grows best in misty, overcast conditions
  • Color varieties: Pitcher flowers can be greenish yellow, but many are brilliant red

This beautiful, carnivorous flower usually grows in mountainous regions in Malaysian Borneo. It is very difficult to grow in captivity. But if you’re lucky enough to see one in the wild, you’ll probably first notice the bright red, phone-cord-like coil at the mouth of the insect-catching pitcher. 

32. Red Spider Flower

The red spider flower is another example of a species of colorful flower native to Australia.
  • Latin name: Grevillea speciosa
  • When it blooms: Usually between late winter and late spring
  • Soil needs: Well-drained soil is a plus
  • Sun exposure: Usually prefers full sun, but partial shade is usually ok
  • Color varieties: Most flowers are red, but occasionally, pink spider flowers can be spotted in the wild

The red spider flower is another example of a species of colorful flower native to Australia. This species is a shrub, so it also can become an eye-catching centerpiece or accent for a garden. It gets its name for its red flower clusters; they have downward-facing tendrils that look like a spider’s legs.

33. Calytrix Leschenaultii

Calytrix Leschenaultii is a wild shrub native to parts of Australia.
  • Latin name: Calytrix leschenaultii
  • When it blooms: Usually between June and Novemeber
  • Soil needs: Prefers sandy soil
  • Sun exposure: Does best in full sun
  • Color varieties: Most flowers are a vivid, almost electric purple. Occasionally, wild plants have pink, blue, or white flowers.

This plant with its stunning, star-like flowers is another wild shrub native to parts of Australia. Somewhat surprisingly, it doesn’t have a common name, and most people just refer to it by its Latin name.

34. Desert Rose

The desert rose is one of the most beautiful flowers on Earth.
  • Latin name: Adenium obesum
  • When it blooms: Usually in spring and summer
  • Soil needs: Needs fairly dry soil with infrequent watering
  • Sun exposure: Does best with full sun
  • Color varieties: Most flowers are red or pink. The edges of the petals are darker, and they fade to white close to the flower’s center.

Even though the desert rose is one of the most beautiful flowers on Earth, it is poisonous. Some African tribes even use it for poison arrows when hunting. It often grows on thick-stemmed shrubs, but it’s a popular houseplant in bonsai form.

35. Peruvian Lily

The Peruvian Lily looks a bit like a cross between an iris and a lily.
  • Latin name: Alstroemeria pelegrina
  • When it blooms: Between October and December
  • Soil needs: Does best in rocky soil
  • Sun exposure: Prefers full sun
  • Color varieties: Petals are pink around the edges with deep purple centers. Some appear to have deep pink centers and pale pink edges

This stunning bloom looks a bit like a cross between an iris and a lily. It is usually found in Chile. And unlike many lily species, it thrives in coastal regions on cliffs and in rocky soil.

36. Gipsy Girl Crocus

The gipsy girl crocus is a specific variety of the Snow Crocus.
  • Latin name: Crocus chrysanthus ‘Gipsy Girl’
  • When it blooms: Typically late winter to early spring
  • Soil needs: Prefers average soil with medium moisture
  • Sun exposure: Prefers light shade to full sun
  • Color varieties: Most flowers are golden yellow. The feather-like stripes can be bronze, red, or maroon.

This lovely plant is a specific variety of the Snow Crocus. Its flowers are an energetic golden yellow. The outer petals have feather-like stripes that are typically red to maroon in color. 

37. Frida Kahlo Rose

The Frida Kahlo Rose is one of the most colorful of all.
  • Latin name: Rosa ‘WEkcifrabaun’
  • When it blooms: Typically between spring and summer, depending on climate
  • Soil needs: Does best with medium-moist, well-drained soil
  • Sun exposure: Prefers full sun
  • Color varieties: Each petal has a unique pattern of yellow and pink, and the roses have a painted appearance

This stunning rose variety, named after one of the world’s best-known painters, is one of the most colorful of all. Each petal’s swirling blend of pink and yellow looks like a watercolor sunrise.

38. Parrot’s Beak

The Parrot's Beak is native to the Canary Islands.
  • Latin name: Lotus berthelotii
  • When it blooms: Can bloom year round in warm climates
  • Soil needs: Does well in a range of soil types
  • Sun exposure: Needs full sun
  • Color varieties: Flowers are usually crimson red, bright lemon yellow, or orange

This lovely plant is native to the Canary Islands. And just as its name implies, its sharp-edged flowers look a lot like the beak of a parrot. 

39. Willow Leaf Crowea

The Willow Leaf Crowea is a striking Australian shrub.
  • Latin name: Crowea saligna
  • When it blooms: Usually from April to November
  • Soil needs: Does well in well-drained soils of many different types
  • Sun exposure: Prefers partial shade to full sun
  • Color varieties: Its starry flowers are typically pink to pale purple in color

This striking Australian shrub can sometimes be found in gardens across the world. Its flowers have sharp, pointed petals like stars, and they contrast beautifully with the plant’s deep green leaves.

40. Red Flowering Gum

The Red Flowering Gum is a type of eucalyptus.
  • Latin name: Corymbia ficifolia
  • When it blooms: From December to May
  • Soil needs: Prefers sandy, dry soil
  • Sun exposure: Likes full sun
  • Color varieties: Most flowers are bright, energetic red, but some can be pink or orange

This unique flowering tree is a type of eucalyptus. Though it grows in the wild in parts of Australia, it’s commonly grown in many other countries. Irish scientists are even working on developing cold-hardy variants so this colorful plant can survive year-round in Dublin. 

41. Porcelain Flower

The Porcelain Flower has been cultivated for over 200 years.
  • Latin name: Hoya carnosa
  • When it blooms: From spring to late summer
  • Soil needs: Needs well-aerated soil
  • Sun exposure: Prefers full sun but can grow in partial sun
  • Color varieties: Wild plants are usually white, but different cultivars can be pink, red, orange, purple, and more

This plant, also known as the wax flower, has been cultivated for over 200 years. It grows well in pots, and its flower clusters smell especially sweet. Like hydrangeas, its small flowers grow in ball-like clusters.

42. Hit Parade Tulip

This striking tulip cultivar makes a bold addition to any garden.
  • Latin name: Tulipa fosteriana ‘Hit Parade’
  • When it blooms: Between March and April
  • Soil needs: Grows well in almost any soil type
  • Sun exposure: Does best in full sun
  • Color varieties: Usually pink, yellow, red, orange, or a combination of colors

This striking tulip cultivar makes a bold addition to any garden. Its large, cup-shaped blooms come in a whole range of colors, most of which are very bright and energetic.

43. Pink Rock Orchid

The Pink Rock Orchid is most at home in rocky areas of eastern Australia.
  • Latin name: Dendrobium kingianum
  • When it blooms: Usually between August and October
  • Soil needs: Grows best on rock, bark, or in a mixture of small rocks and bark
  • Sun exposure: Prefers full sun
  • Color varieties: Most flowers are a soft, pale pink in color.

This small orchid is most at home in rocky areas of eastern Australia. In captivity, it’s a good choice for those new to growing orchids, as it is relatively easy to grow compared to many species.

44. Yellow-Eyed Flame Pea

The Yellow-Eyed Flame Pea Prefers sandy or clay-like soils.
  • Latin name: Chorizema dicksonii
  • When it blooms: Usually in August through December
  • Soil needs: Prefers sandy or clay-like soils
  • Sun exposure: Does well in full sun
  • Color varieties: Petals are usually peachy or mauve in color. Two bright yellow, eye-like patches show above the reddish pea part of the plant.

This strikingly bright, scrubby plant grows close to the ground in Western Australia. Since it thrives in sandy soils, it happily grows near the coast, on cliffs, and on otherwise rough terrain.

45. Ohia Lehua

Ohia Lehua does well in full sun.
  • Latin name: Metrosideros polymorpha
  • When it blooms: Often during the spring, but sometimes year-round
  • Soil needs: Prefers acidic to neutral soil
  • Sun exposure: Does well in full sun
  • Color varieties: Flowers are often red, but they can also be pink, yellow, orange, or salmon-colored.

Though the hibiscus is probably the most popular Hawaiian flower, the ohia lehua is another colorful symbol of the state. It comes in tree or shrub form, and it’s often the first plant to grow on newly-cooled lava. 

46. Waratah Protea

Waratah Protea is native to New South Wales in Australia.
  • Latin name: Telopea speciosissima
  • When it blooms: Early August to December, depending on climate 
  • Soil needs: Does best in moist soil that still drains well
  • Sun exposure: Prefers full sun
  • Color varieties: Wild blooms are usually a deep magenta color, but different cultivars produce pink or white flowers.

This stunning plant is native to New South Wales in Australia. Its bloom is a “flowerhead,” meaning it’s actually a collection of hundreds of smaller flowers. It was very popular in the first part of the 20th century as a garden plant. It’s less popular now, but it’s still a great way to add a burst of dramatic color to your garden.

47. Sturt’s Desert Pea

Sturt's desert pea usually has bright crimson flowers.
  • Latin name: Swainsona formosa
  • When it blooms: From spring to summer
  • Soil needs: Grows best in well-drained soil
  • Sun exposure: Does well in full sun
  • Color varieties: Flowers are usually a deep red color, but a natural white variant can be found. Some hybrid cultivars are pink, cream, and even tricolored.

This is another of the pea-like plants boasting incredible color. Sturt’s desert pea usually has bright crimson flowers. The center of the flowers, called a “boss,” is a raised bump that is much darker in color.

48. Saw Tooth Banksia

The Saw Tooth Banksia does well in full sun.
  • Latin name: Banksia serrata
  • When it blooms: In the summer
  • Soil needs: Prefers slightly acidic to neutral soil
  • Sun exposure: Does well in full sun
  • Color varieties: Flowers are often bright yellow, but they turn a grayish color as they age

This unique plant looks a little like a wide, cylindrical bottle brush. Its “bristles” or flower spikes are often bright yellow. The saw tooth banksia’s flowers grow on primitive, gnarled-looking trees with distinctive, serrated green leaves.

49. Urn Plant

The urn plant is sometimes grown as a houseplant.
  • Latin name: Aechmea fasciata
  • When it blooms: It only flowers once, usually after 4-5 years
  • Soil needs: Needs moisture-rich but well-draining soil
  • Sun exposure: Prefers partial shade
  • Color varieties: Most wild plants in Brazil are mostly pink with some pale purple petals. However, domestic cultivars produce flowers in a range of different colors.

This strange, stunning plant looks almost alien. Its large, round flowers are mostly pink with sharp, pointed petals. It does contain a ring of smaller, purple petals. It’s part of the bromeliad family, and you can see the resemblance to the pineapple. Thanks to its beauty, it is sometimes grown as a houseplant.

50. Kahili Ginger

Kahili ginger is an invasive species that often takes resources from native species.
  • Latin name: Hedychium gardnerianum
  • When it blooms: Usually from August to late fall
  • Soil needs: Grows well in a wide variety of soils
  • Sun exposure: Does well in shady areas
  • Color varieties: Flowers are a golden yellow with red central tendrils

This plant has clusters of small, golden blooms that look like a tropical version of honeysuckle. But despite its beauty, Kahili ginger is an invasive species that often takes resources from native species.

51. Self-Heal

The self heal gets its name from its many uses in herbal medicine.
  • Latin name: Prunella vulgaris
  • When it blooms: Usually from mid-summer to late summer
  • Soil needs: Prefersmoist, marshy soil
  • Sun exposure: Prefers full sun, but may need some shade in very warm climates
  • Color varieties: Most plants have cylindrical clusters of lavender to lilac flowers, but some plants have white blooms

This oddly-named plant gets its name from its many uses in herbal medicine. It is related to mint, and its greens make an interesting addition to salads. They grow quickly and can be used as a ground cover.

52. Golden Torch Cactus Flower

The Golden Torch Cactus Flower is native to Argentina.
  • Latin name: Echinopsis spachiana
  • When it blooms: Usually from June to July
  • Soil needs: Prefers rocky or desert-like soil
  • Sun exposure: Prefers full sun, although flowers open at night
  • Color varieties: Flowers are usually bright white with many ruff-like petals. Their centers are a bright, flame-like yellow.

This stunning cactus flower is native to Argentina. True to its name, each flower is like a torch flame atop its bright green, post-like body. Though they are abundant in the wild, golden torch cacti are great potted plants that are both beautiful and easy to care for.

53. Trailing Nasturtium

The Trailing Nasturtium makes a lovely addition to any garden and is easy to grow.
  • Latin name: Tropaeolum majus
  • When it blooms: Usually in late spring or summer
  • Soil needs: Does well in moist yet poor quality soil
  • Sun exposure: Prefers full sun
  • Color varieties: Many cultivars are yellow, orange, red, cream, or maroon, but some multicolored variants are available.

Interestingly enough, this plant is not a member of the Nasturtium genus. It makes a lovely addition to any garden and is easy to grow. Its large-petaled flowers are usually bright orange, red, or yellow. All parts of the plant are edible, and it makes a visually appealing addition to salads. 

54. Pink Flowering Banana

The Pink Flowering Banana has beautiful flowers.
  • Latin name: Musa ornata
  • When it blooms: Usually in late summer
  • Soil needs: Prefers moist soil
  • Sun exposure: Does best in partial sunlight
  • Color varieties: Flowers are a bright medium pink with yellow-orange centers

Though this plant has beautiful flowers, its fruit can’t be eaten. Still, it is appealing enough to be grown as an ornamental plant in many parts of the world. Once a stalk starts to sprout, it can grow up to seven feet in one season.

55. Flowering Quince

The flowering quince can bring a lot of variety to a garden.
  • Latin name: Chaenomeles speciosa
  • When it blooms: Usually in the spring
  • Soil needs: Prefers acidic to neutral soil pH
  • Sun exposure: Produces the most flowers in full sun
  • Color varieties: Many plants produce bright red blooms, but they can also be found in white, orange, and pink

This beautiful plant with its rose-like flowers is native to China. It grows as a shrub or a small tree. The flowering quince can bring a lot of variety to a garden. Flowers appear before the leaves, and in the winter, it produces attractive and edible small fruits. 

56. Black Caraway

The caraway seed is used extensively in Middle Eastern cuisine.
  • Latin name: Nigella sativa
  • When it blooms: Usually from late spring to early fall
  • Soil needs: Prefers moist but not overly wet soil
  • Sun exposure: Grows best in full sun
  • Color varieties: Most flowers are bright white to pale blue. They appear to extend perpendicular to the center, making its flower look disc-like.

Caraway seed is used extensively in Middle Eastern cuisine. But even if you don’t want to grow it for culinary purposes, it’s a beautiful flower to have around. Its blue flowers are star-like and especially beautiful.

57. Golden Kangaroo Paw

Golden Kangaroo Paw is one of the best-looking wild Australian plants.
  • Latin name: Anigozanthos pulcherrimus
  • When it blooms: Usually in spring and fall
  • Soil needs: Needs medium-moist soil
  • Sun exposure: Does best in full sun
  • Color varieties: This variety has golden-yellow blooms, but some other species have green, red, or multicolored flowers

This stunning plant is one of the best-looking wild Australian plants, but it also grows well in gardens. As the name suggests, its oddly shaped flowers are roughly the shape of the paws of a kangaroo.

58. Ice Plant

The Ice Plant spreads quickly and becomes a brilliant ground cover.
  • Latin name: Delosperma cooperi
  • When it blooms: Typically from June to October
  • Soil needs: Handles many soil types as long as they are well-drained
  • Sun exposure: Grows best in full sun
  • Color varieties: Flowers are usually pink, purple, or red, although multicolored hybrid cultivars are available as well.

Though the name might make you think that this plant grows in ice, the name comes from its glittering, ice-like blooms. It spreads quickly and becomes a brilliant ground cover; you might sometimes hear of it called “pink carpet.”

59. Hellebore

The Hellebore genus covers several species, but all of them have rose-like blooms that flower when many other plants are dormant.
  • Latin name: Helleborus atrorubens
  • When it blooms: Usually between December and April
  • Soil needs: Does best with rich soil ranging from neutral to somewhat alkaline
  • Sun exposure: Prefers shady areas
  • Color varieties: Blooms are usually reddish, and they often appear mottled with pink and/or green

The Hellebore genus covers several species, but all of them have rose-like blooms that flower when many other plants are dormant. But even though their blooms are beautiful, be careful; almost every Hellebore species is poisonous.

60. Tower of Jewels

The tower of jewels can be found in the wilds of the Canary Islands.
  • Latin name: Echium wildpretii
  • When it blooms: It flowers in the second year of its life but then dies
  • Soil needs: Does well in dry, desert-like soil
  • Sun exposure: Prefers full sun
  • Color varieties: Flowers are usually red or pink

This unusual and stunning plant can be found in the wilds of the Canary Islands. And true to its name, it looks like a tower of red, jewel-like flowers. It is sometimes incorporated into gardens in warmer climates, but it is very susceptible to frost.

61. Pink Cornflower

Pink cornflower can be a pale baby pink to a more intense shade depending on the specific variety.
  • Latin name: Centaurea cyanus
  • When it blooms: Usually blooms in summer
  • Soil needs: Prefers soil that is neutral to slightly alkaline
  • Sun exposure: Needs full sun to grow optimally
  • Color varieties: Natural flowers are usually blue, but pink cornflower are the result of selective breeding

Cornflowers are some of the most delicately beautiful blooms. This one is a lovely domestic cultivar. Pink cornflower can be a pale baby pink to a more intense shade depending on the specific variety.

62. Frangipani

Frangipani is used to make leis in Hawaiian culture.
  • Latin name: Plumeria rubra
  • When it blooms: Usually in summer
  • Soil needs: Prefers rich soil that is dry to medium-moist
  • Sun exposure: Does best in full sun
  • Color varieties: There are nearly endless cultivars of this plant. Some are whitish with yellow-edged petals, some are bright magenta, and some are mottled with many different colors. 

This beautiful flower might look familiar. It is used to make leis in Hawaiian culture. Thanks to its beauty, it is a very popularly grown plant, and it is available in many different colors. 

63. Toad Lily

Despite its somewhat unappealing name, the toad lily is actually very beautiful.
  • Latin name: Tricyrtis hirta
  • When it blooms: Usually in the fall
  • Soil needs: prefers well-drained soil that is slightly acidic
  • Sun exposure: Does best in shady areas
  • Color varieties: White to off-white with deep red to deep purple spots

Despite its somewhat unappealing name, this lily is actually very beautiful. In the wild, it is whitish in color with many small, dark purple spots. It is native to Japan and very hardy, making it a good choice of garden plant.

64. Flame of the Woods

The Flame of the Woods are some of the most popular garden plants in the southern part of Florida.
  • Latin name: Ixora coccinea
  • When it blooms: In warm enough climates, it blooms almost all year
  • Soil needs: Prefers neutral to mildly acidic soil
  • Sun exposure: Prefers full to partial sun
  • Color varieties: Most flowers are red or pink, but certain cultivars come in orange, white, and other colors

These stunning, tropical flowers are some of the most popular garden plants in the southern part of Florida. Their pinwheel-like blooms are red to pink, but they become paler toward the center of the flower.

65. Canna

Canna flowers are usually fiery red-orange with long, spear-like petals.
  • Latin name: Canna indica
  • When it blooms: Usually from August to October
  • Soil needs: Does best in well-drained, acid to neutral soil
  • Sun exposure: Prefers full sun
  • Color varieties: Flowers are usually fiery red-orange with long, spear-like petals. However, there is also a bright yellow variant. Some cultivars produce other colors as well.

This strange and beautiful flower has a surprising use; thanks to its ability to remove chemical compounds from water, it is sometimes used to purify wastewater from paper mills and similar industrial buildings.

66. Aster

Aster can add a bold color splash to any garden.
  • Latin name:  Aster alpinus
  • When it blooms: Usually late spring to the middle of summer
  • Soil needs: Prefers slightly moist soil that is slightly acidic to neutral
  • Sun exposure: Does best in full sun
  • Color varieties: Asters come in almost every color, including red, orange, pink, purple, and white.

These colorful, daisy-like flowers are very popular in floral arrangements. They also can add a bold color splash to any garden. However, they don’t typically grow well in very humid areas.

67. Bee Balm

True to its name, bee balm is a flower that provides an excellent food source for bees.
  • Latin name: Monarda didyma
  • When it blooms: Early summer through early fall
  • Soil needs: Prefers moist soil that drains well
  • Sun exposure: Does best with full sun
  • Color varieties: Many cultivars exist; some are red, some are pink, and some are bluish.

True to its name, bee balm is a flower that provides an excellent food source for bees. It also is a powerful attractant for hummingbirds and other pollinators. 

68. Stargazer Lily

The Stargazer lily is a hybrid cultivar of the Oriental lily.
  • Latin name: Lilium ‘Stargazer’
  • When it blooms: Usually mid-summer to late summer
  • Soil needs: Does best in loamy or sandy soil that drains well
  • Sun exposure: Prefers full sun
  • Color varieties: This cultivar is usually bright pink with darker pink spots

The Stargazer lily is a hybrid cultivar of the Oriental lily. Its name comes from the fact that it was specifically bred for its blooms to face upward, unlike most other Oriental lilies.

69. Morning Glory

Morning glories are sometimes used in gardens, and some cultivars include multiple colors on a single flower.
  • Latin name: Ipomoea purpurea
  • When it blooms: Usually from summer until the first frost
  • Soil needs: Prefers medium-moist soil with a neutral to acidic pH
  • Sun exposure: Does best in full sun
  • Color varieties: Usually, flowers are purple, white, pink, or blue

These delicate, pretty blooms are most commonly seen as wildflowers. They are so named because their flowers close overnight and open in the morning. These vine-growing flowers are sometimes used in gardens, and some cultivars include multiple colors on a single flower.

70. Blood Lily

The blood lily has a cluster of small red flowers that form a head-turning bulb.
  • Latin name: Scadoxus multiflorus
  • When it blooms: Can bloom at any point with sufficient sunlight
  • Soil needs: Needs nutrient-rich soil that is sandy or loamy
  • Sun exposure: Prefers partial sun
  • Color varieties: Most plants are a bright crimson red

This stunning and unusual plant has a cluster of small red flowers that form a head-turning bulb. Their bright coloring has made them a favorite of container gardeners. However, they are very toxic to humans and animals, and some cultures have even used them to make poison arrows.

71. Saffron Crocus

The saffron crocus plays a very important role in the culinary world.
  • Latin name: Crocus sativus
  • When it blooms: Usually in the fall
  • Soil needs: Does well in nutrient-rich soil that drains well
  • Sun exposure: Prefers full sun
  • Color varieties: Most flowers are soft purple, but the saffron stigmas are bright red.

This beautiful crocus plays a very important role in the culinary world. The stigmas of the flowers are collected to produce saffron, the world’s most valuable spice by weight. Its bright red stigmas pop out against its soft, lavender-colored petals.

72. Crimson Columbine

The crimson columbine only be found in the western U.S.
  • Latin name: Aquilegia formosa
  • When it blooms: Usually in mid-spring
  • Soil needs: Does best in sandy, loamy soils
  • Sun exposure: Prefers partial shade
  • Color varieties: Petals are crimson to reddish orange, but the center of the bloom is very bright yellow

This striking wild plant can commonly be found in the western U.S. You might be surprised to hear that its beautiful blooms are edible, but eating the seeds can sometimes be fatal.

73. Bougainvillea

The bougainvillea plant does very well in warm environments where frost is rare.
  • Latin name: Bougainvillea glabra
  • When it blooms: Usually between November and May
  • Soil needs: Needs well-drained soil
  • Sun exposure: Prefers full sun
  • Color varieties: The tiny flowers themselves are white, but they are surrounded by papery “bracts” that look like petals. Those bracts are usually deep, bright pink in color.

This striking, climbing bloom is sometimes called “paperflower.” But the part that looks papery is the collection of bracts, which are petal-like structures surrounding the small flowers themselves. The bougainvillea plant does very well in warm environments where frost is rare.

74. Hyacinth

Sometimes, hyacinth bulbs can be specially treated to force them to bloom early.
  • Latin name: Hyacinthus orientalis
  • When it blooms: Usually in the early spring
  • Soil needs: Needs moist but well-drained soil
  • Sun exposure: Prefers full sun to part shade
  • Color varieties: It comes in a range of colors, including pale yellow, blue, purple, red, pink, white, and more.

This beautiful plant is grown all over the world, both for its beauty and its sweet fragrance. In fact, there are over 2,000 cultivars available to choose from. Sometimes, hyacinth bulbs can be specially treated to force them to bloom early (usually around Christmas).

75. Clivia

In order to grow optimally, clivia plants need to periodically go for months without water.
  • Latin name: Clivia miniata
  • When it blooms: Usually between April and July
  • Soil needs: Does well with very rich soil that still drains well
  • Sun exposure: Prefers moderate shade
  • Color varieties: Many cultivars are red, yellow, or red-orange. There are also some varieties that are white, cream, or apricot.

These especially stunning flowers can be tough to grow, but it’s well worth it. Some clivia societies even hold flower shows for their plants. Interestingly enough, in order to grow optimally, clivia plants need to periodically go for months without water.

76. Saba Chrysanthemum

Saba Chrysanthemum are jewel-toned in color.
  • Latin name: Chrysanthemum indicum ‘Saba’
  • When it blooms: Late summer to early winter, depending on climate
  • Soil needs: Prefers fertile, well-drained soil
  • Sun exposure: Needs partial shade
  • Color varieties: This particular variety has a bright yellow center. The petals are dark pink to maroon, and they are outlined in white.

Many chrysanthemums are jewel-toned in color. But this one, named after a Caribbean island, has a uniquely tropical appeal. The stunning petals feature white outlines with bold streaks of deep pink to purple. They’re perfect if you want something different.

77. King Protea

King Protea is native to South Africa.
  • Latin name: Protea cynaroides
  • When it blooms: Usually blooms periodically through the year
  • Soil needs: Prefers sandy soil that drains well
  • Sun exposure: Prefers full sun
  • Color varieties: The center of the flower head is green and white, and it is surrounded by bright pink, petal-like bracts.

This unusual plant’s large head makes it a standout. It’s the national plant of its native South Africa. It is also uniquely adapted to surviving wildfires; it has a long underground stem covered in buds that will reach the surface if the plant is burned.

78. Cosmos

Cosmos is part of the daisy family.
  • Latin name: Cosmos bipinnatus
  • When it blooms: From late spring until fall
  • Soil needs: Does well in a range of soil types
  • Sun exposure: Prefers full sun
  • Color varieties: Usually, flowers are pink, maroon, white, pale purple, or yellow.

This lovely flower is part of the daisy family. It grows quickly and requires little care, so it’s a beginner-friendly way to add a touch of delicate color to your garden.

79. Anthurium

Anthurium is sometimes called the flamingo flower.
  • Latin name: Anthurium scherzerianum
  • When it blooms: Can bloom throughout the year
  • Soil needs: Needs soil that is rich but highly porous
  • Sun exposure: Prefers partial shade
  • Color varieties: Flowers are usually a very bright red or pink

This stunning red or pink flower is sometimes called the flamingo flower. It is somewhat popular as a houseplant, and it has even been given the Award of Garden Merit from the Royal Horticultural Society.

80. Angel’s Trumpet

The angel's trumpet was once found in wild forests.
  • Latin name: Brugmansia aurea
  • When it blooms: Usually from mid-summer through fall
  • Soil needs: Needs moist, fertile soil
  • Sun exposure: Prefers part shade to sun
  • Color varieties: Flowers are usually bright yellow, red, orange, or white.

Though this plant was once found in wild forests, it is now officially classified as extinct in the wild. It is poisonous if ingested, but it is still cultivated by gardeners for its beauty. 

81. Hippeastrum Amaryllis

Hippeastrum Amaryllis is a lily-like bloom that is popular as a houseplant.
  • Latin name: Hippeastrum reginae
  • When it blooms: Usually between winter and spring
  • Soil needs: Needs moderately moist soil
  • Sun exposure: Prefers direct sunlight
  • Color varieties: There are many, many available cultivars. Most are very bright in color, and reds, yellows, and oranges are very common.

The beautiful amaryllis is a lily-like bloom that is popular as a houseplant. Their petals are somewhat pointed at the ends, making the flowers look like small stars. 

82. Pansy

The pansy is one of the most popular garden plants in the world.
  • Latin name: Viola × wittrockiana
  • When it blooms: Usually from spring to summer in cooler areas but fall to winter in hotter areas
  • Soil needs: Prefers soil that drains well
  • Sun exposure: Prefers full to partial sun
  • Color varieties: Pansies can be found in almost any color, including yellow, red, purple, blue, orange, and white.

The pansy is one of the most popular garden plants in the world. There are almost endless colors and cultivars of it, from classic solid colors to striking, variegated blooms. Often, the flowers have darker patches toward the center of the petals, making each flower look a bit like a face.

83. Gladiolus

Gladiolus is a genus including hundreds of flower species.
  • Latin name: Gladiolus sp.
  • When it blooms: Usually spring or summer
  • Soil needs: Likes soil that is sandy and/or well-drained
  • Sun exposure: Prefers full sun
  • Color varieties: It comes in many colors, but yellow, orange, red, and pink are some of the most popular.

Gladiolus is a genus including hundreds of flower species. They come in many colors, and horticulturalists have created many different hybrids as well. These flowers can be very rewarding to grow, but they also look especially nice when incorporated into cut flower bouquets. When it comes to ornamental flowers, the gladiolus is certainly unmatched. 

84. Flame Lily

The flame lily, part of the genus Gloriosa, stands out with its uniquely rippled petal edges.
  • Latin name: Gloriosa superba
  • When it blooms: Usually from spring to fall
  • Soil needs: Prefers rich, sandy or loamy soils
  • Sun exposure: Does best in full sun or partial shade
  • Color varieties: Flowers are usually bright and energetic colors, including deep pink, orange, red, and yellow.

Many of the most colorful flowers in the world are also very unique when it comes to structure. The flame lily, part of the genus Gloriosa, stands out with its uniquely rippled petal edges. Most of these flowers also have petals of deep magenta. They are native to parts of Asia and Africa, but they also grow well in many other parts of the world.

85. Hydrangea

This genus of plants is often associated with the southern United States, but there are different hydrangea species all over the world.
  • Latin name: Hydrangea sp.
  • When it blooms: Usually from mid-spring to early fall
  • Soil needs: Prefers rich, moist soil that still drains well
  • Sun exposure: Prefers partial sun
  • Color varieties: These plants change color based on soil pH. More acidic soil produces blue flowers, more alkaline soil produces pink hydrangeas, and more neutral pH produces purple flowers. The plants also can produce white flowers, which are not affected by pH changes. 

This genus of plants is often associated with the southern United States, but there are different hydrangea species all over the world. Many of the more popular species are known for their heavy, nodding clusters of flowers.

Nature’s Most Colorful Flowers

So there you have them. Over 80 of the most colorful flowers in the world. Find some that grow well in your climate and plant them, or simply enjoy admiring them from afar. We hope they’ve brought some joy into your life.